Marketing

Move Over Kylie, Kim Kardashian’s Makeup Line Is Estimated to Make $14.4 Million In 5 Minutes

With her clothing and accessories line, fragrance collection and wildly successful video game app, it seemed like only a matter of time before Kim Kardashian West added a cosmetics line to her ever-growing list of fashion and beauty entrepreneurial endeavors. Last week, the reality TV star confirmed the official launch date, June 21, 2017 for her new beauty line, KKW Beauty, to her 101 million Instagram followers.

In an interview with WWD, Kardashian expressed her readiness for her new business enterprise. “We have a good model, and even from our lip kit, we have a really good general idea of what our customer is going to be like. We are definitely prepared for the demand," she explained. And by high demand, she means an estimated of $14.4 million in sales--within the first five minutes.

According to the industry experts, KKW Beauty is expected to mirror the sister duo's wildly successful lip kits, which garnered $13.5 million in sales. And although the famous sisters are technically still new to the makeup world, unlike sister and Estée Lauder model Kendall Jenner, their sales are expected to compete with beauty powerhouses like L’Oréaland Estée Lauder

KKW Beauty's first products will consist of a Créme Contour and Highlight Kit, and if we've learned anything from the social media mogul's past, this is just the beginning.

Meet the man behind all those NBA playoff T-shirts

In the wee hours of of April 29, shortly after the Clippers defeated the Jazz to force a series-deciding Game 7, Todd Schneiderman’s phone buzzed and blinked. As Clippers coach Doc Rivers compiled his team’s gameplan for the Sunday contest, Schneiderman engrossed in preparations to blanket the Staples Center in white XL T-shirts.  Point guards like Isaiah Thomas, John Wall, James Harden and Stephen Curry have dominated this postseason. Schneiderman runs point for a company called SomethingInked, a Nashville-based promotional vendor that creates the majority of free playoff T-shirts given out by NBA and NHL teams. SomethingInked has supplied T-shirts for four of the last five NBA champions and Schneiderman himself has attended the last four NBA Finals. He has built a reputation for maximizing teams’ flexibility and their imaginations. “We try to not print until we actually know there’s a game,” he said.  After breaking in with the local Grizzlies and Predators, SomethingInked permeated the NBA and NHL by incessantly dialing team after team. “Called ‘em, and and called ‘em, and called ‘em, over and over and over again until they finally gave us a shot,” Schneiderman said. Bill Feldberg, the company’s vice president of business development, played an integral role initiating relationships with teams. Schneiderman’s father, David, manages all of the company’s vendors and negotiates pricing. Jason Rockhill heads the customer service team, and serves as Schneiderman’s right hand conductor during the postseason. Oliver Landry owns the operation.  SomethingInked first began its affiliation with the Clippers during the 2015 postseason. The team had ordered tens of thousands of red shirts to print that year’s slogan upon, only to learn that their second-round matchup would be against the cherry-colored Houston Rockets. A Clippers executive phoned Schneiderman seeking advice, only to learn SomethingInked had stashed truckloads of blue shirts congruent with the team’s color scheme and primed for printing. “We’re very aggressive in buying the material and being ahead of the curve,” Schneiderman said.   Which brings us back to the whirlwind between Games 6 and 7 of Clippers-Jazz. A horde of white shirts had been waiting at a printer in Camarillo, Calif. that Friday night, and the shop sprung to action after the final buzzer. The staff emblazoned the Clippers’ “It Takes Everything” tagline onto the shirts, complete with blacklight ink. A truck arrived at 8 a.m. Saturday morning and drove directly to downtown Los Angeles. By 4 a.m. Sunday morning, the shirts arrived at Staples Center waiting to be planted across each and every seat inside the arena. Schneiderman was also responsible for the Grizzlies’ rapid production of the David Fizdale-inspired “Take That For Data” T-shirts.   A gigantic whiteboard in Schneiderman’s office boasts SomethingInked’s entire playoff strategy, just like coaches scribble their pregame notes inside team locker rooms. On the left, he’s etched the list of teams, the dates of their games and the status of those game-by-game orders. In the middle, Schneiderman has drawn a calendar depicting every contest the company is responsible to outfit every single day of the month. On the right, he keeps a running log of the company’s available inventory, should another team call last-minute, desperate for a reservoir of colored shirts unavailable anywhere else. At the bottom, the company’s owner, Landry has jotted, “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” Providing hundreds of thousands of postseason T-shirts began a laborious battle to even connect with teams.  Once the playoffs began, SomethingInked was accountable for playoff shirts for at least one game every day from April 12-30. “It’s a very time sensitive exercise,” said Warriors CMO Chip Bowers, a longtime collaborator with the company. “But when you work with the same people and they’re a trusted source, I think it makes things a lot easier.” Even still, havoc always arises.  In the 2014 NBA Finals, SomethingInked provided giveaway T-shirts for both the Spurs and the Heat. San Antonio originally had no plans to provide shirts for that Sunday’s Game 5, but after the soon-to-be champions emerged victorious in a Thursday-night Game 4, Schneiderman promised the organization he could have 22,000 shirts printed and in the Alamo for the ultimate game. “The next thing you know, I got handed a large amount of money to go find different items,” Schneiderman said. Mathematically, however, time would not allow for printing the massive order in Nashville and trucking the shirts to San Antonio.  Schneiderman put them on a plane. He phoned Southwest, which deemed they had to divide the hundreds of boxes onto four separate aircrafts. That’s when true bedlam ensued. Two portions of the boxes landed in Dallas, another in Los Angeles and the fourth in New Orleans. “So, you can imagine the call I got,” Schneiderman said. He hired a truck to ship the shirts from NOLA and Dallas to San Antonio and, without other options, chartered a private plane to deliver the batch from L.A. The entire order arrived by 8:30 in the morning on Sunday. The Spurs’ cast of 300 people finished laying the shirts out on each chair by 11 a.m., three minutes before doors opened. “A little crooked,” Schneiderman said. “but they were there.”  The Rockets spent years honing what the organization now deems “T-shirting” the arena. It takes about four hours for the staff and volunteer groups, ranging from 70-100 people, to completely lay out each collector’s item. The Rockets divide their army into groups of three. One person opens a box at the end of an aisle, counting out however many seats makeup that specific row. A second places each shirt onto every chair and a third neatly fits the item on the back of the seat.  “We’ve perfected the process over the years,” said Ken Sheirr, Houston’s vice president of marketing.  Each team’s playoff slogans must be approved by the league office by March 1, allowing Adidas ample time to print the taglines and be able to outfit 15 players on court. Many teams now employ in-house creative departments to concoct the phrases. Schneiderman has literally sat down with clubs to devise the mantras. It will be hard to ever top the Cavaliers’ slogan a season ago. “All In To 16” not only represented the number of wins required to capture a title, but the year (’16) and Cleveland’s (216) area code. “It was kind of a triple entendre,” said Tracey Marek, the Cavaliers’ chief marketing officer.  Should Cleveland and Golden State rematch in this year’s Finals, it will be another championship run for Schneiderman and SomethingInked. Not only is the company responsible for the Warriors’ gold, PMS 123C, giveaway T-shirts, but it also prints a portion of the Cavaliers’ in-arena merchandise. “This is playoffs, there’s no other word for it,” Schneiderman said. “You work all year to get to these two months.” Two months of dry-erase calculations and endless minutes on the phone. Take that for data.   

In the wee hours of of April 29, shortly after the Clippers defeated the Jazz to force a series-deciding Game 7, Todd Schneiderman’s phone buzzed and blinked. As Clippers coach Doc Rivers compiled his team’s gameplan for the Sunday contest, Schneiderman engrossed in preparations to blanket the Staples Center in white XL T-shirts.

Point guards like Isaiah Thomas, John Wall, James Harden and Stephen Curry have dominated this postseason. Schneiderman runs point for a company called SomethingInked, a Nashville-based promotional vendor that creates the majority of free playoff T-shirts given out by NBA and NHL teams. SomethingInked has supplied T-shirts for four of the last five NBA champions and Schneiderman himself has attended the last four NBA Finals. He has built a reputation for maximizing teams’ flexibility and their imaginations. “We try to not print until we actually know there’s a game,” he said.

After breaking in with the local Grizzlies and Predators, SomethingInked permeated the NBA and NHL by incessantly dialing team after team. “Called ‘em, and and called ‘em, and called ‘em, over and over and over again until they finally gave us a shot,” Schneiderman said. Bill Feldberg, the company’s vice president of business development, played an integral role initiating relationships with teams. Schneiderman’s father, David, manages all of the company’s vendors and negotiates pricing. Jason Rockhill heads the customer service team, and serves as Schneiderman’s right hand conductor during the postseason. Oliver Landry owns the operation.

SomethingInked first began its affiliation with the Clippers during the 2015 postseason. The team had ordered tens of thousands of red shirts to print that year’s slogan upon, only to learn that their second-round matchup would be against the cherry-colored Houston Rockets. A Clippers executive phoned Schneiderman seeking advice, only to learn SomethingInked had stashed truckloads of blue shirts congruent with the team’s color scheme and primed for printing. “We’re very aggressive in buying the material and being ahead of the curve,” Schneiderman said. 

Which brings us back to the whirlwind between Games 6 and 7 of Clippers-Jazz. A horde of white shirts had been waiting at a printer in Camarillo, Calif. that Friday night, and the shop sprung to action after the final buzzer. The staff emblazoned the Clippers’ “It Takes Everything” tagline onto the shirts, complete with blacklight ink. A truck arrived at 8 a.m. Saturday morning and drove directly to downtown Los Angeles. By 4 a.m. Sunday morning, the shirts arrived at Staples Center waiting to be planted across each and every seat inside the arena. Schneiderman was also responsible for the Grizzlies’ rapid production of the David Fizdale-inspired “Take That For Data” T-shirts. 

A gigantic whiteboard in Schneiderman’s office boasts SomethingInked’s entire playoff strategy, just like coaches scribble their pregame notes inside team locker rooms. On the left, he’s etched the list of teams, the dates of their games and the status of those game-by-game orders. In the middle, Schneiderman has drawn a calendar depicting every contest the company is responsible to outfit every single day of the month. On the right, he keeps a running log of the company’s available inventory, should another team call last-minute, desperate for a reservoir of colored shirts unavailable anywhere else. At the bottom, the company’s owner, Landry has jotted, “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” Providing hundreds of thousands of postseason T-shirts began a laborious battle to even connect with teams.

Once the playoffs began, SomethingInked was accountable for playoff shirts for at least one game every day from April 12-30. “It’s a very time sensitive exercise,” said Warriors CMO Chip Bowers, a longtime collaborator with the company. “But when you work with the same people and they’re a trusted source, I think it makes things a lot easier.” Even still, havoc always arises.

In the 2014 NBA Finals, SomethingInked provided giveaway T-shirts for both the Spurs and the Heat. San Antonio originally had no plans to provide shirts for that Sunday’s Game 5, but after the soon-to-be champions emerged victorious in a Thursday-night Game 4, Schneiderman promised the organization he could have 22,000 shirts printed and in the Alamo for the ultimate game. “The next thing you know, I got handed a large amount of money to go find different items,” Schneiderman said. Mathematically, however, time would not allow for printing the massive order in Nashville and trucking the shirts to San Antonio.

Schneiderman put them on a plane. He phoned Southwest, which deemed they had to divide the hundreds of boxes onto four separate aircrafts. That’s when true bedlam ensued. Two portions of the boxes landed in Dallas, another in Los Angeles and the fourth in New Orleans. “So, you can imagine the call I got,” Schneiderman said. He hired a truck to ship the shirts from NOLA and Dallas to San Antonio and, without other options, chartered a private plane to deliver the batch from L.A. The entire order arrived by 8:30 in the morning on Sunday. The Spurs’ cast of 300 people finished laying the shirts out on each chair by 11 a.m., three minutes before doors opened. “A little crooked,” Schneiderman said. “but they were there.”

The Rockets spent years honing what the organization now deems “T-shirting” the arena. It takes about four hours for the staff and volunteer groups, ranging from 70-100 people, to completely lay out each collector’s item. The Rockets divide their army into groups of three. One person opens a box at the end of an aisle, counting out however many seats makeup that specific row. A second places each shirt onto every chair and a third neatly fits the item on the back of the seat.  “We’ve perfected the process over the years,” said Ken Sheirr, Houston’s vice president of marketing.

Each team’s playoff slogans must be approved by the league office by March 1, allowing Adidas ample time to print the taglines and be able to outfit 15 players on court. Many teams now employ in-house creative departments to concoct the phrases. Schneiderman has literally sat down with clubs to devise the mantras. It will be hard to ever top the Cavaliers’ slogan a season ago. “All In To 16” not only represented the number of wins required to capture a title, but the year (’16) and Cleveland’s (216) area code. “It was kind of a triple entendre,” said Tracey Marek, the Cavaliers’ chief marketing officer.

Should Cleveland and Golden State rematch in this year’s Finals, it will be another championship run for Schneiderman and SomethingInked. Not only is the company responsible for the Warriors’ gold, PMS 123C, giveaway T-shirts, but it also prints a portion of the Cavaliers’ in-arena merchandise. “This is playoffs, there’s no other word for it,” Schneiderman said. “You work all year to get to these two months.” Two months of dry-erase calculations and endless minutes on the phone. Take that for data.

 

6 Digital Trends Business Owners Need To Be Paying Attention To Right Now

Digital marketing evolves every day, forcing all leaders to keep up or fall behind. Once well-known and popular brands like Sears, Sports Authority, and Blockbuster (remember them?) fizzled out because they either couldn’t or didn’t want to keep up with changes in marketing. No one expects to become one of those brands, but the truth is, if you don't know what trends are coming around the corner, you could put yourself at risk. 

This year's Digital Ascendant Conference brought together a highly curated group of leaders from some of the biggest brands in the world to talk about digital. My team was invited to attend, and we caught up with speakers and attendees to get more insights into the future of digital marketing. To help you avoid the same fate, here are six trends industry leaders need you to pay attention to.

1. Creating content for content’s sake will get you nowhere.

I think most companies know by now that they should be creating content. What they forget sometimes is that creating content just for the sake of creating content isn't going to do much. That content should be guided by a documented content strategy and connected to your company's goals. According to Kaydee Bridges, VP of digital and social media strategy at Goldman Sachs, there has to be a meaningful value exchange with everything you put out. The same applies to your content.

One of the best ways to get the most out of your content is to tap into your intellectual capital: your internal experts and thought leaders. Use their insights and turn them into consistent sources for content creation. Their unique insights and points of view add authenticity to your marketing and help your audience feel more connected to your brand.

2. Influencer outreach needs to be seen as an owned asset, not just paid media.

Influencer marketing continues to be a growing trend, in major part because it can be so effective. However, Socialtyze CEO John Bohan says most brands aren't approaching influencer marketing correctly. They're coming to it with a very campaign-centric mindset, thinking mostly in the short term and hoping they see a quick bump in sales as a result — and that's not true influencer marketing

Companies are doing what Bohan calls "superficial influencer identification," selecting influencers mostly by their personas. But effective partnerships start with identifying influencers who already love your brand or have engaged social followings that align with your company and offering them some data-driven creative guidance.

The most exciting part of influencer marketing is the long-term potential and the opportunity to create a powerful marketing database of influencers that your brand can control. CMOs should view influencer marketing as more of an owned asset and long-term partnership to take advantage of those opportunities.

3. The days of the generalist agency are numbered.

It's no secret that marketing is evolving. The number of channels marketers need to incorporate into their plans is becoming more complex at a faster and faster pace, and agencies are becoming more specialized out of necessity. Their expertise will be increasingly deep, not wide.

To keep up with this evolution, marketing leaders can't just rely on sheer spend through a few simple channels anymore. Kepler Group CEO Rick Greenberg recommends hiring at least one true digital specialist who is comfortable with code, data, and all things tech who can be the go-between for your brand and your specialist agency partners. Your specialist and the agency need to work side by side, making transparent decisions in real time around how every penny is spent.

4. The shift to customer-centric business means the CMO has a more powerful seat in the boardroom.

Successful brands focus on the customer, and that requires all departments to be on the same page: The customer comes first. According to Deloitte Digital CMO Alicia Hatch, because companies are becoming more consumer-centric and marketing is closest to the consumer, this shift puts CMOs in a new position of power and responsibility for the way their companies connect with customers.

As the customer gatekeeper and experience shaper, the CMO has insights that can affect the entire business and help the whole company improve by learning directly from the customer. Brand experience is formed by every single touchpoint your customer has with your company, so the vision — communicated by the CMO — needs to be executed across more than just your website: Every part of the company should be on board.

5. Big data means there are no excuses for poor marketing decisions.

In the past, it wasn't uncommon for a CMO to allocate a solid chunk of his marketing budget without being asked to prove exactly what each dollar achieved.

Kerry Bianchi, president and CEO at Collective, pointed out how much things have changed since then, particularly in terms of accountability. CMOs today have to get a lot more transparency into data and analytics because that's how their executive teams hold them accountable and how they're able to measure their efforts.

Tech has even developed to help leaders connect the dots between online and offline worlds, too. Dean Vegliante, president of Netmining, mentioned that brick-and-mortar businesses can even use data to figure out store visitation rates and connect their online campaigns to driving in-store traffic.

Because data can show you which decisions lead to which outcomes, marketers are better able to attribute their budgets to results. Everyone and his mother has an opinion on creative; data means CMOs can come to the table with the facts to make better decisions.

6. Brands must start paying attention to their digital-native competitors.

Plenty of recent upstarts, like Dollar Shave Club, are coming from a new generation of digital natives, and when leaders dismiss them or don't take them seriously as competitors, they're making a mistake.

Samir Bhavnani, area vice president for 1010data, explained that the brands that didn't invest in digital earlier are getting crushed by these digital natives because they were slow to understand the importance of evolving. They're only just now starting to put some spend behind innovation and technology and digital communication. They're testing a lot of options pretty quickly and cheaply, and in many cases, it's too little too late.